What is 450 grams in yarn?

Hi There!

3 skeins

I’m told in the blogosphere that there are frequent searches for “What is 450 grams in yarn? “

Hmm. . .

Well, on the surface that is an easy question.  Converting grams to ounces, 450 grams is 15.87 ounces or almost a pound.

If you are a visual person, 450 grams is nine of the smaller blue skeins of yarn (50 grams) in the picture above, or four and a half skeins of one of the other (100 grams) skeins.

A very rough way to do the conversion is to know that 50 grams is somewhat less than two ounces and 100 grams is somewhat less than four ounces.  So, four skeins at  four ounces each plus a half skein to make up for the “somewhat less” is about 16 ounces or about a pound.

This is one of the few arenas that have transitioned to metric.  And here’s why I think that is true.  Going to metric allowed the manufacturers to reduce the amount of yarn by a margin, from 2 ounces to 1.76 ounces.  Just like my ice cream that isn’t a half gallon anymore; only 1.5 quarts.  But I digress.

So 450 grams is about a pound. So what, right?

“How many yards is in 450 grams of yarn?”

If the question is really, “How many yards is in 450 grams of yarn?”, the answer depends. It depends mostly on whether the yarn is bulky or fine or somewhere in the middle. For example, The Noro Odori yarn on the left is a bulky yarn that knits at 3.5 stitches per inch. There are 108 yards in a 100 gram skein.  The Malabrigo Sock yarn in the middle knits at 8 stitches per inch and has 440 yards per 100 gram skein.  Finally the Classic Elite Silky Alpaca Lace is a much finer yarn, designed to be knit into an open, lacy fabric.  So even though it’s knitting gauge is only a bit smaller than the sock yarn (8.5 stitches per inch), there are 460 yards in a 50 grams skein.

“What can I do with 450 grams of this yarn?”

If the questions is “What can I do with 450 grams of this yarn?”, the answer again depends.  The thickness of the yarn determines how much fabric you can make.

That amount of bulky Noro yarn could make 4 or 5 hats or a smallish vest. Anything knit from this yarn would be thick and heavy.

You could make four or five pairs of adult socks or a lightweight women’s sweater  from 450 grams of sock yarn.

Nine skeins of the lace yarn would make nine scarves or three large shawls.  You could also use multiple strands to make a medium sized sweater.

Why 450 grams?

The question, I can’t answer is why lots of people would be interested in 450 grams of yarn, rather than 500 or 100 or 729 grams.  Anyone have an idea about that?

Thanks for stopping by.  I’m off to more KnitKnot Adventures.

Jann

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3 thoughts on “What is 450 grams in yarn?

  1. I searched and was so happy to see this post. The 450g is how the weight some of the European yarn spools Boodles come in. Was looking for a compatible American yarn to use. Thanks.

    Like

    • I looked on Ravelry and there are two yarns named “Geronimo”; both are made by Linate. One yarn is sock weight and the other is dk weight. I’m not sure if the dk yarn is what you mean by the big one. If so, it has 218 yards in 100g, so there are 918 yards in 450 grams. But I have a feeling neither of these yarns are the one you are talking about.

      Your best best is to ask the manufacturer of the yarn how many yards in a specific weight. Then calculate the yards in the amount of yarn you have.

      If that doesn’t work, and you can’t find the yarn on line, then you will need to wind off some yarn onto a scale – 5 grams perhaps – then measure the yardage in those 5 grams and calculate from there.

      I hope one of these ideas is helpful.

      Like

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